Last edited by Yozshujora
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

3 edition of Division of lands and funds of Osage Indians in Oklahoma, etc. found in the catalog.

Division of lands and funds of Osage Indians in Oklahoma, etc.

United States. Congress. House. Committee of Conference

Division of lands and funds of Osage Indians in Oklahoma, etc.

by United States. Congress. House. Committee of Conference

  • 391 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by [s.n.] in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Tribal trust funds,
  • Osage Indians,
  • Oklahoma

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesConference report on bill for division of lands and funds of Osage Indians in Oklahoma
    SeriesH.rp.4996
    The Physical Object
    FormatElectronic resource
    Pagination4 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16088767M

    CHAP. An Act For the division of the lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and IIouse of Representatives of tte United States of America in Congress assernbled, That the roll of the Osage tribe of Indians, as shown by the records of the United States in the office. Other areas within Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri also may use the name "Osage Hills" although may not actually be within the specific Osage Hills area. Footnotes [ edit ] ^ Kappler, Indian Affairs ; "An act for the division of the lands and funds of the Osage Indians etc.".

      Return to List of BIA Records, Arranged by State Pictures Kept by Supt. L. S. Bonnin: Cheyenne and Arapaho Agency: Mrs. BonninNational Archives Identifier Navigating Record Group 75 Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Records This guide is arranged geographically by state and thereunder contains a listing of tribes and bands living within that state’s borders. Under each entry for . [Public, No. ] of the lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma, ard for other pur-poses," approved J , and Acts amendatory thereof and supple-mental thereto. Osage Indian lands, Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the etc.,iOklhoma.

    Fort Osage, afterwards Fort Clark, where Sibley, Mo., now is, was established in October, , as a protection to the Osage Indians, as cited in the preamble of the treaty of Novem , with the tribe. But the Government dealt unfairly in that matter. The fort and trading post had been promised in and in Following the American Civil War (–65), pressure on the U.S. government to open all Native American lands to emigrant settlement resulted in the sale of the Kansas reservation. The proceeds were used to purchase land for the Osage in Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma). The discovery of oil on the Osage reservation in the late 19th century and an agreement with the U.S. government by.


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Division of lands and funds of Osage Indians in Oklahoma, etc by United States. Congress. House. Committee of Conference Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Amazon Editors' Pick for the Best Book of In the s, the Osage found themselves in a unique position among Native Americans tribes. As other tribal lands were parceled out in an effort by the government to encourage dissolution and assimilation of both lands and culture, the Osage negotiated to maintain the mineral rights for their corner of Oklahoma, creating a kind of /5(K).

In the s, the Osage Indians were herded onto a small tract of land in Oklahoma—land that unexpectedly held vast reserves of oil, rendering the tribe incredibly rich overnight. By law, the Osage had mineral rights outright, although they were still treated like children, requiring a white "guardian" to manage their assets/5(70).

The Osage Nation Real Estate Services Department provides management and oversite on approximatelyacres of individually and tribally owned restricted and trust lands. The Department offers farming and grazing lease management of individual and tribally owned properties.

governing the lands of the Osage Nation; and 3. The General Allotment Act which applies to all other tribes. The legal basis for the federal government’s control of Indian lands is found in the Constitution of the United States. The federal government has complete jurisdiction over Indian tribes and their lands.

This is the first recorded meeting between the Osage and Europeans. Forced westward by successive waves of European immigrants, found the tribe in Kansas. Inthe Osage agreed to the sale of their Kansas lands and to the purchase of a permanent home in Indian Territory, now Osage County, Oklahoma.

The Osage moved there in Allotment brought a division of the Osage Trust Estate. This financial estate came from treaty settlements, land sales from the Kansas Reservation, and accumulated interest on money held in trust by the United States. This was distributed to each living Osage and amounted to a little more than ten thousand dollars each.

Official website of the Osage Nation, a federally-recognized Native American government. Headquartered in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, approx. 60 miles northwest of Tulsa, Osage Nation exercises governmental jurisdiction over the Osage reservation, a more than square miles area extending from Tulsa to Kansas.

Today, we joined Osage Tribe Principal Chief John Red Eagle, other tribal leaders, and our colleagues at the Treasury Department, in a ceremony to commemorate a historic settlement marking the end of a long-running lawsuit by the Osage Tribe of Oklahoma regarding claims involving the United States’ accounting and management of the tribe’s.

In the book, Grann quotes Louis F. Burns, the eminent Osage historian, as saying, “I don't know of a single Osage family which didn't lose at least one family member." “Killers of the Flower Moon” is a fascinating and compelling read and a sad piece of Oklahoma history.

In the early s, the Osage had been driven from their lands in Kansas onto a rocky, presumably worthless reservation in northeastern Oklahoma. An early Osage camp on the reservation. The United States government started to take away land from the Osage Indians in A reservation was formed for the Osage Indians in Southern Kansas in As with many other tribes they were relocated to Oklahoma.

Many Osage Indians still live in Oklahoma around the Pawhuska area. The Osage Indians hunted small game, elk, deer, bear, and. Grann’s new book, about how dozens of members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma in the s were shot, poisoned or blown to bits by rapacious whites who coveted the oil under their land.

OF LANDS ALLOTTED AMONG THE OSAGE INDIANS There are sever al features in the Osage allotments under the Act of J34 Stat.that are unique to them. In the first place, all of the land in the reservation was allotted. There were three rounds in each of which each allottee selected acres.

Following that, the. Background. In oil was first discovered in Osage County. The United States federal government's Department of the Interior managed leases for oil exploration and production on land owned by the Osage Nation through the Bureau of Indian Affairs and later managed royalties, paying individual allottees.

As part of the process of preparing Oklahoma for statehood, the federal government. The restrictions concerning lands and funds of allotted Osage Indians, as provided in this Act and all prior Acts now in force, shall apply to unallotted Osage Indians born since July 1,or after the passage of this Act, and to their heirs of Osage Indian blood, except that the provisions of Section 6 of the Act of Congress approved.

David Grann was already interested in writing a book about the serial murders of members of the Oklahoma-based Osage Indian tribe when he visited the Osage Nation Museum.

On one wall was a. Osage Ceded Lands from homestead entry and pre-emption sales. The Osage Trust Lands were to be sur-veyed and sold at no less than $ per acre. These ces-sions left the Osage tribe with million acres in southern Kansas, the Osage Diminished Reserve.8 Meanwhile, with each cession of land by the Indians.

INDIAN HILLS RESORT_ View Print (1 token) INDIAN HILLS RESORT PG.2_ View Print (1 token) INDIAN OAKS_ View Print (1 token) INDIAN OAKS III_ SOUTH OSAGE HILLS ADDITION PG1_ View Print (1 token) SOUTH OSAGE HILLS ADDITION PG2_ View Print (1 token) SOUTH SIDE AVANT_5.

View Print (1 token). The Division of Land Titles and Records (DLTR), and its 18 Land Titles and Records Offices (LTRO), are the official Federal offices-of-record for all documents affecting title to Indian lands, and for the determination, maintenance, and certified reporting of land title ownership and encumbrance on Indian trust and restricted lands.

6 The Act ofwhich was an act for the division of lands and funds of the Osage Indians, provided for the making of a roll to include living members as of January 1,and all children born up to July 1, It appears that this roll on which allotments of lands.

MRS. J. GEORGE WRIGHT— From the center of social and governmental activities in Washington, District of Columbia, to the Osage Indian Agency in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, would seem to be a somewhat violent and perhaps disconcerting transition, but Irene Basford has assumed so easily, so graciously, and so significantly the duties and.

His quest took him to the Osage Nation, a remote territory in Oklahoma about the size of Delaware. Like much of the area that was set aside for Native Americans, it. Official website of the Osage Nation, a federally-recognized Native American government. Headquartered in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, approx.

60 miles northwest of Tulsa, Osage Nation exercises governmental jurisdiction over the Osage reservation, a more than square miles area extending from Tulsa to Kansas.